Greenwashing or great brand marketing?

The Rainforest Alliance‘s Follow the Frog viral video now boats more than 3.8 million views. If you have not seen it, the now-viral video is a made-for-YouTube brand promotion for the organization’s efforts to save the rainforest through preservation and collaboration with corporate partners, who put a cute little frog logo on their products.  (The organization’s actual mission statement is here; and wow, they publish slick annual reports too.)

The video itself mocks what I could only presume to be do-good, liberal-guilt-drenched, white, middle-class YouTube users that direct action, person-to-person contact with other cultures, and global-minded activism are failed and meaningless strategies for dupes like the star of this video. The moral? Why quit your job? Why learn about things first hand and be involved in meaningful efforts overseas? Most importantly, why stop shopping? Instead, sit back, relax, and buy more stuff with a little frog. And, by doing that, you can save the forest ecosystems and those charismatic critters and natives you care so passionately about.

That, in a nutshell, is the storyline. Oh, and if you do participate in failed efforts abroad, your wife might leave you for another man who is, yes, not white. (No, I am not making this up. This race element is integral to the “follow the Kermit” story. Please tell me this was not intentional, please, OK?)

Nazi filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl at work with the Nazis during the making of Triumph of the WIll.

Nazi filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl at work with the Nazis during the making of Triumph of the WIll.

Clearly, the Rainforest Alliance’s brand managers and media team hit pay dirt with this one. Be one of us, sport tattoos, be cool, and be a froggy consumer. (These brand managers need to consult in public health, which lacks a hip frog right now.)

Does that mean they are not just, as some critics claim, “greenwashing” consumerism? This creepily somewhat reminds me of the wildly successful Kony 2012 phenomenon, itself the artistic step-child of Nazi propagandist Leni Riefenstahl’s seductive 1934 film Triumph of the Will. That acclaimed masterpiece of filmmaking, by nearly all metrics, ultimately celebrates the virtues of the National Socialist Party led by dictator Adolf Hitler, a year after he peacefully seized control of the German state.

A scene of the Nazis during a rally filmed by Leni Riefenstahl for Triumph of the Will, one the most successful propaganda films ever.

A scene of the Nazis during a rally filmed by Leni Riefenstahl for Triumph of the Will, one the most successful propaganda films ever.

Do not get me wrong. I buy certified organic coffee. I love cat videos and Jimmy Kimmel’s infamous twerking video as much as the next YouTube user. But, ouh la la, there really is nothing more powerful than a good story, a clever media product, and the right artist to sell just about anything, from armchair activism to strong-arm fascism.

Sadly, I do not think you can teach this stuff. The best and the brightest will inevitably also work with the nastiest, wealthiest, and the worst, sometimes more than with the “virtuous.”

So, what do you think about following the frog? Good for forests? Or, something completely different?

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